MARSHALL SOCIETY ESSAY COMPETITION 2017

The Marshall Society Essay Competition 2017

The Marshall Society, the Economics society of the University of Cambridge, is pleased to announce the opening of its annual essay competition. This is an opportunity for all students currently working towards A-levels, the IB or equivalent qualifications to demonstrate their ability to write a convincing and well-structured essay, making use of both economic theory and real world evidence where appropriate. Entrants are advised to make their essays as concise as the topic allows; the guideline is 1500 words. As always we encourage students to come up with their own titles, but they should equally feel free to use any of the suggested titles listed below should they wish to do so:

1. To what extent is micro finance a revolutionary engine for growth in developing countries?

2. ‘Recent years have shown us that conventional monetary policy just isn’t enough.’ Comment

3. Does China provide a feasible framework for other emerging economies to follow?

4. ‘The twin deficits run by the UK suggest inherent structural failure within our economy.’ To what extent do you agree?

5. Is it possible to predict the next recession, if so how and what can we do about it?

6. ‘Economics is the study of the individual abstracted from individuality.’ Discuss

7. Does the recent political climate indicate an imminent retreat from the economic liberalisation of recent decades?

8. ‘The rise of businesses like Uber and AirBnB necessitate a greater role for trust within our economy.’ Comment

Entries can be submitted via email attachment to magazine@marshallsociety.com (please ensure that it is attached in either Microsoft Word or PDF format). The email should contain your full name, school, date of birth and a declaration of any assistance you received from teachers or tutors.

The deadline for essay submissions is 11:59pm 31st July 2017

The essays will be judged individually and the shortlist, runners up and winner will be announced by the end of summer. The author of the winning essay will also receive £100; the two runners up will receive £50 each. In addition to this, a selection of the best essays will be published in the 2017-2018 edition of the Marshall Society’s magazine, the Dismal Scientist. If you have any queries regarding the competition please contact the magazine editor at magazine@marshallsociety.com.

Please also observe that by entering you agree to the terms and conditions listed below:

1. Your submitted essay must be your work alone and any assistance given to you whilst writing your essay must be declared in your email.

2. You cannot make any revisions to your essay once it has been submitted.

3. Only students studying in sixth form or below (graduating in 2017 or later) or any international equivalent are eligible. Please note that you do not have to be studying in the UK to enter.

4. Any personal data relating to entrants will be used solely for the purpose of this competition and will not be disclosed to any third parties for any purpose without prior consent.

5. The essay that is entered may not be entered into any other competition.

6. The winner, runners up and those with shortlisted essays will be contacted via the email used to submit the essay. Unfortunately, any other feedback will not be possible to any of the entrants.

7. The Marshall Society reserves the final right, where necessary, to make amendments to the above terms and conditions and to select the winners of the competition.

The Marshall Society Essay Competition 2017

After much deliberation the Marshall Society is pleased to announce the results of its annual essay competition. All entrants are to be commended on the exceptionally high quality of their submissions, which made choosing the essays that were to be shortlisted particularly difficult. Congratulations to the author of the winning entry, Jonathan Belay, who wrote a thought provoking piece on whether ‘The UK Government is to be blamed for Poverty’, as well as to the two runners up, Jenny Guo and Abid Rahman, who wrote on the UK’s twin deficit problem and the question of individuality within the study of Economics respectively. Below these titles are listed in full alongside the whole shortlist of highly commended essays:

Winner

Jonathan Belay King Edward VI Grammar School ‘The UK Government is to be blamed for Poverty.’ Discuss.

Runners-up

Jenny Guo D’Overbroeck’s College  ‘The twin deficits run by the UK suggest inherent structural failure within our economy.’ To what extent do you agree?
Abid Rahman Harrow School ‘Economics is the study of the individual abstracted from individuality.’ Discuss.

Shortlist

Kevin Cai The Perse School To what extent does social media create herd behaviour and how does this affect the likelihood of bank runs?
Michael Derevianko Auckland Grammar School Does China provide a feasible framework for other emerging economies to follow?
Hanni Dong Queenswood School Does China provide a feasible framework for other emerging economies to follow?
Harry Gearty The Grammar School at Leeds ‘Recent years have shown us that conventional monetary policy just isn’t enough.’ Comment
Samuel Gibson Loreto Sixth Form College Universal basic income: Society’s Panacea
Celesta Liu Concord College Does China provide a feasible framework for other emerging economies to follow?
Dylan Perera  Wilson’s School To what extent is micro finance a revolutionary engine for growth in developing countries?
Vamsi Pratapa King Edward VI Camp Hill School for Boys  Does China provide a feasible framework for other emerging economies to follow?
Nurassyl Shokeyev  Eton College ‘Free trade is an evil.’ How far do you agree?
Uberto Tarantelli Eton College ‘Capitalism is both self-contradictory and self-destructive.’ Discuss
Joshua Tucker Midsomer Norton Sixth Form To what extent are there economic justifications for reducing wealth inequality?