Essay Competition Results 2020

After receiving a record number of entries (500+), the Marshall Society is pleased to announce the results of its 2020 essay competition. It has been wonderful to receive so many of your essays and a great pleasure reading them all. For this, the Society thanks all those who entered and wishes you all the best for the future. Congratulations to the author of the winning essay, XinYu Fu, and congratulations to the three runners-up!

This year, the essays were so numerous and of such a high standard that we decided to introduce two new awards. We have noted those essays we thought were worthy “highly commended” and “commended” awards.

Congratulations to all!

Winner:

XinYu Fu – Evaluate how, and to what extent the State influenced the economic prosperity of the Song Dynasty (960 AD – 1279 AD)

Runners-up:

Arda Battalgazi – To what extent should society be concerned about the consequences of crisis stimulus packages?

Oliver James Fernandes – Climate change is widely considered to be the greatest threat facing the human race in the modern era. However, the economic costs of tackling it are significant, with lost growth contributing to greater poverty and potentially human mortality, particularly in the developing world. With these costs in mind, discuss whether it is worth taking drastic global action to stop climate change.

Yuchuan Gan – Is it in the United States’ interest to isolate and sanction the Chinese economy, or should it continue its previous policy of greater co-operation and trade?

Highly Commended:

 Yi Lin Li, Yang Yue Chen,  Bonita Sosai, Elizabeth Zhu. Samantha Ningsum Wong, Minjun Kye, Lu shiqi, Lydia Chen (Possible mistake in name), Yixiang (Thomas) Zhang, Haoze Zhu, Nikhil Mittal, Ayushman Mukherjee.

Commended: 

Tim Chiu, Kuanseok Song, Aarathy Thusyanthan, Yanhe Xuan, Philippa Jane Whitney Stokes,  Zubair Hasan Asim, Cees Armstrong, Adhil Sunil Kumar,  Xie Jiarun, Qinghui Wang, WU ZITONG, Huang Qirong, Han Sizhu, Wu Xuezhou, Bhakti Savani, Anish Goel, Eugenie Grace Bailey, Fengzhuoyang Zhu, Zehui Ren, Xinyi Sun, Alberto Panicucci, Baoji Lu, Amaan Khan, Freddie Yu, Bilal Rashid, Maxwell Delorenzo, Daniel Xu, Rohan Gopinath, David Lawrence, Om Chikane, Rushil Bhat, Arjun Dhawan, Meiyan Qu, John Chang, Tim Haggitt.

Unfortunately, we are unable to give individual feedback or confirm receipt of essays due to how many essays there were. Nevertheless, the essays were of a generally high standard and we enjoyed reading them!

Suggested titles:

  1. Since World War Two, countries have reduced trade barriers and have tended to move towards free trade. Should the world follow a similar path with respect to immigration and open all borders?
  2. Is it in the United States’ interest to isolate and sanction the Chinese economy, or should it continue its previous policy of greater co-operation and trade?
  3. Climate change is widely considered to be greatest threat facing the human race in the modern era. However, the economic costs of tackling it are significant, with lost growth contributing to greater poverty and potentially human mortality, particularly in the developing world. With these costs in mind, discuss whether it is worth taking drastic global action to stop climate change.
  4. A command economy can never be successful at allocating scarce resources. Discuss.
  5. In a time of crisis and shortage should essentials, such as toilet paper, be subject to price controls to prevent price gouging?
  6. ‘It occurred to me one day that Sparta, though among the most thinly populated of states, was evidently the most powerful and most celebrated city in Greece; and I fell to wondering how this could have happened. But when I considered the institutions of the Spartans, I wondered no longer’ – Xenophon in Constitution of the Lacedaemonians
    Pick one event, period, or country in history and argue whether its institutions can account for its success or failure in promoting economic development.